Archive for the ‘Press Releases’ Category

Ardagh Glass and Reuse Group invest £5m in recycling push

Ardagh has three glass manufacturing plants in Yorkshire, and is partnering Reuse to increase the volume of cullet, which has so far boosted recycling for clear glass by 12%.

West Yorkshire based Reuse is one of the UK’s leading glass recycling companies.

£5m Investment

Jamie Brown Head of Production Reuse and Sharon Crayton Head of Marketing Ardagh Glass.

The partnership’s £5m investment in new sorting and separation technology comprises a four-stage process, starting with the removal of medium-sized organic and loose ferrous metals, followed by a drying section to remove dust and smaller materials, and thirdly, the removal of residual metallic, leaded glass and materials that burn at much higher temperatures than container glass such as pyrex. The final and most critical stage subjects the remaining material to a thorough cleaning before it is separated by colour using a range of advanced cleaning, purification and optical sorting techniques.

This new technology enables much better material recovery of glass by colour from the waste stream – glass particles as small as 4mm can now be successfully separated by colour, as opposed to only 10mm with the previous technology.

This has already helped Ardagh to increase the recycled content of the glass bottles and jars that it produces by 12%.

The resulting “pure” cullet is then supplied to Ardagh as high quality recycled glass for use in its furnaces to make new bottles and jars.

Larry Mantell, procurement director UK, Ardagh Group, told Packaging News the investment was made by Reuse on the strength of the 15-year supply agreement with Ardagh.

“This supply contract includes an agreement to maintain the latest technology, therefore if technology moves on then the plant will receive further investment. We strive to increase our recycling rates as high as possible, glass in infinitely recyclable and perfectly satisfies the requirements of a circular economy where no resources are wasted by going into landfill.”

Mantell added that investment and supply requirements are constantly being reviewed in line with market conditions and business requirements.

Sharon Crayton, head of marketing at Ardagh Glass, Europe, said the company has been producing green bottles that contain over 90% of recycled glass for years, but high recycling levels for clear (flint) glass have posed a challenge due to difficulties in colour separating.

“This new technology has put us at the forefront of UK recycling, helping us to significantly increase the recycled content for clear (flint) bottles and jars. For example, our Doncaster plant which is focused solely on the production of clear (flint) glass, achieved an average recycled content level of over 50% in the first quarter of 2014 against an average recycling rate of 32% in the same quarter of 2013.”

The new Reuse glass sorting and separation facilities have a total capacity for up to 250,000 tonnes of waste glass – approximately 13% of the UK’s steam of waste glass.

With waste glass collection increasingly moving away from bottle banks to kerbside collections, recycling firms have found it challenging to separate the glass from other recyclables, and then re-processing it into quality colour separated cullet.

Mark Wilson, chief executive of Reuse, said: “This latest investment, the first in an ongoing programme, gives us the technology to produce more finished cullet of the highest standard to meet the growing requirements of Ardagh.

“However, it remains easier and more effective to recycle glass back into glass bottles and jars when glass is collected separately from other packaging materials. We therefore urge councils to consider this when renewing their waste management contracts.”

(Reuse Collections Ltd t/a Berryman part of the Reuse Group)

Information from www.packagingnews.co.uk 22nd July 2014.

Berryman to invest £9m in glass recycling sites

Glass recycler Berryman is to invest £9 million in improving its operations which include upgrading the colour sorting equipment at its Knottingley site in Yorkshire, in a bid to improve quality.

The revelation came as the company urged councils to do also more to improve the quality of glass collected for recycling to make sure it is suitable for remelt.

The £9 million investment is being split between two sites – Knottingley and South Kirkby. The bulk of Berryman’s £9 million investment will be spent on upgrading the colour separation equipment at the firm’s Knottingley site to K9 Flash technology provided by KRS Recycling Systems.

The company said this technology will be able to achieve a 99% accuracy in colour separation, allowing for a better quality material to be processed into furnace ready cullet. The machine will also come with a de-labeller. The remainder of the money will help improve operations at South Kirkby.

The K9 Flash machine is an optical separator which sorts the glass into three different colours – flint, amber and green – as well as removing ceramic, stones and porcelain. It will use a light source, a high speed camera and an electronic and air ejection unit to do this.

Investment
Discussing the investment, Mark Wilson, chief executive of Berryman told letsrecycle.com: “The business had been slowly deteriorating in terms of profit but essentially the recycling market is very simple and we need to get back to basics to understand what the key drivers are. We restored it quite quickly back on to a profit… This has given us the confidence to undertake £9 million worth of investment.”

Mr Wilson continued: “What we are investing in is the colour separation plant at Knottingley. To start with the machinery is KRS and uses K9 Flash technology.

“K9 Flash technology would do a pre-processing element then the mixed glass is presented for colour separation and it looks at the glass with optical sorters.”

Work on the Knottingley site is expected to begin at the end of July 2013 and the technology should take ten weeks to install, during which time the facility will be out of action. During that time Berryman’s Doncaster site will process the glass which would have been handled at Knottingley.

Once commissioning has taken place, the Knottingley site will then only accept mixed coloured feedstock and the separated colours will go to Doncaster.

At present at the Knottingley site, glass is weighed and bulked up after arriving. It is loaded into a vibrating hopper which feeds it into the facility. It then undergoes a sorting process which sees the manual and automatic removal of recyclables such as metals and plastics. Ceramics and other non-recyclables including stones are also removed as the glass is screened, sorted and crushed to produce a furnace ready cullet of varying sizes depending on the customers’ specifications.

Councils
However, Mr Wilson said that while Berryman councils also need to play their part to improve the quality of glass.

“Because the industry collection methodology has moved from bottle banks the amount of investment required to extract glass in its three separate colours is at a significant increase.”
- Mark Wilson, Berryman

Mr Wilson said the move towards commingled kerbside collections has had a detrimental effect on the quality of the glass collected for recycling but also means “significant” investment is needed by recycling firms to be able to sort and process the material.

In a bid to tackle this, he suggested that councils should look to encourage the separate collection of glass by stipulating the methodology in contracts or outlining what percentage of material should go to remelt processes in the UK.

Discussing the impact commingled collections have on glass recyclers, he said: “Because the industry collection methodology has moved from bottle banks the amount of investment required to extract glass in its three separate colours is at a significant increase. It is all being driven by EU legislation and now the fact that councils are incentivised by government on a tonnage basis rather than a quality basis.
“What that has meant and it is not just for glass recycling it is for all recyclates is that to extract recyclates the amount of investment we need to get the glass out is significantly greater. We have to invest in huge expensive machines to take out metals, take out paper and take out plastics.”

Contracts
Looking at what councils can do to improve the situation, he said: “Councils can do more in their contracts to help. They could specify that glass goes specifically to UK manufacturing processes or state that a percentage of the glass must go to remelt processes in the UK.”

Friends of Glass grows in Europe and the UK

Friends of Glass, the consumer group supported by the UK and European glass industry that promotes the right for consumers to be able to choose food and drink products in glass packaging, is growing in numbers, strength and influence.
Its campaigns to unite all those who believe glass is the clear choice for themselves, their families and for the environment, has now attracted 10,000 members and 150,000 visitors to its website. Many thousands more are joining through its Facebook pages and on Twitter.
They are keen to know and promote the message that glass is the superior packaging material when it comes to health, taste and the environment – the three most important ingredients I think you will agree.

Friends of Glass, the consumer group supported by the UK and European glass industry that promotes the right for consumers to be able to choose food and drink products in glass packaging, is growing in numbers, strength and influence.

Its campaigns to unite all those who believe glass is the clear choice for themselves, their families and for the environment, has now attracted 10,000 members and 150,000 visitors to its website. Many thousands more are joining through its Facebook pages and on Twitter.

They are keen to know and promote the message that glass is the superior packaging material when it comes to health, taste and the environment – the three most important ingredients I think you will agree.

Among the facts they are keen to share are:

  • Over 70% of shoppers questioned in a recent major survey say that they want to still buy certain foods in glass packaging, but struggle to find it in-store
  • 62% of people prefer to drink from a glass, with 82% of consumers preferring to drink white wine and 74% red wine from a glass too
  • Glass is the only single layer packaging that does not require additional layers to protect your food and drink
  • Glass is inert and completely odourless: that’s why perfume only ever comes in glass bottles – because it doesn’t change the scent
  • The European glass industry uses 50% less energy than it did in the 60s – that’s 1.5% reduction in energy every year thanks to increased recycling, more efficient technologies and lightweighting.
  • Unlike other materials, glass does not taint the original taste or quality of the food and drink it contains. Take a look at www.friendsofglass.com/glassaddsclass for the latest competitions and information about the great taste of glass
  • Environmentally glass is good news as it can be endlessly recycled. Every time you recycle a glass bottle or jar, you’re doing your bit to help the planet.  A typical glass jar or bottle can take just 30 days to go from recycling bin back to a new container on the store shelf.

Friends of Glass’s most recent campaign – Nothing to Hide – is so called because glass is a 100% pure packaging material with nothing added. It is the only material that doesn’t need an added chemical layer to protect food and drink. The campaign was launched in twelve countries across Europe including the UK and has since has gained thousands of supporters. Check out www.nothingisgoodforyou.co.uk to find out why glass is the only choice when it comes to peace of mind on health.

Do you have something to say about glass? Join in the conversation online:

Share your views, learn something new about glass or consider becoming one of the special Friends of Glass Ambassadors. Find out more at www.friendsofglass.com. You can also follow Friends of Glass on Facebook and Twitter and join the conversation today!

Become a Friend of Glass today. Sign up at www.friendsofglass.com

Targets stay the same whilst PRN prices plummet

Those who follow the PRN (Packaging Recovery Notes) value of recovered glass will have noticed a dramatic fall in recent months. At the time of writing (November 8 2010) it may have plummeted to as little as £4.75 per tonne, its lowest level in years. A further decline is certainly on the cards.
It will therefore come as no surprise that the price that can be commanded for cullet (recovered glass) has also fallen significantly. Unlike other packaging materials, a large percentage of the value of glass is linked to its PRN value, and the fall in PRN value has prompted the fall in the price for the recovered glass.
With the news that Defra has announced that it would not be raising glass packaging recycling targets from the current figure of 81% for 2011 and 2012, this situation looks set to continue for the foreseeable future. Some commentators have even suggested the possibility of charging to remove glass.
“Of course we are having to react accordingly to this unexpected PRN drop, “ says Berryman’s General Manager, Mick Keogh.
But because there is an increasing differential between the price of mixed glass and glass of individual colours, particularly clear and amber glass, he advises suppliers to look very carefully at the quality of the material they are offering.
“Now is a good time to review the way you recover and sort your glass packaging, and there is a particularly good case for colour separation.”

Those who follow the PRN (Packaging Recovery Notes) value of recovered glass will have noticed a dramatic fall in recent months. At the time of writing (November 8 2010) it may have plummeted to as little as £4.75 per tonne, its lowest level in years. A further decline is certainly on the cards.

It will therefore come as no surprise that the price that can be commanded for cullet (recovered glass) has also fallen significantly. Unlike other packaging materials, a large percentage of the value of glass is linked to its PRN value, and the fall in PRN value has prompted the fall in the price for the recovered glass.

With the news that Defra has announced that it would not be raising glass packaging recycling targets from the current figure of 81% for 2011 and 2012, this situation looks set to continue for the foreseeable future. Some commentators have even suggested the possibility of charging to remove glass.

“Of course we are having to react accordingly to this unexpected PRN drop, “ says Berryman’s General Manager, Mick Keogh.

But because there is an increasing differential between the price of mixed glass and glass of individual colours, particularly clear and amber glass, he advises suppliers to look very carefully at the quality of the material they are offering.

“Now is a good time to review the way you recover and sort your glass packaging, and there is a particularly good case for colour separation.”

Must We Say Goodbye To Glass?

70% of UK consumers want more glass packaging on shelves but struggle to find it in-store

A new campaign launched today that champions the health benefits of glass packaging will urge consumers to buy their food and drink in glass to ensure glass stays a choice on our shelves.  Backing up the campaign is a major new European-wide survey by TNS that reveals most of us in the UK (70%) want the right to choose glass packaging, but increasingly find that some of our favourite sauces, ketchups and drinks are becoming harder to find in glass.

The campaign ‘Nothing to Hide’ , so called because glass has nothing to hide and nothing added, highlights that with glass packaging, no chemicals are needed to protect food and drink, making it the healthiest way to package our produce. The survey confirmed that 80% of UK consumers trust glass to protect food and drinks against chemicals. Bisphenol-A (BP-A), one of the most commonly found chemicals in non-glass packaging, continues to be a cause of concern amongst health experts and has been banned in France and Denmark for use in children’s food and drink containers.

Supporting ‘Nothing to Hide’ is TV presenter Julia Bradbury, known for her healthy lifestyle and love of all things natural “I’m a big fan of glass” says Julia “ and would hate to see it disappear from our supermarket shelves. I love that fact that glass is 100% pure and made from natural elements. I think we’re all used to it being on our shelves, so it’s easy to take for granted”.

The TNS survey, which interviewed 9500 consumers across 19 countries in Europe, confirms that consumers not only want the right to glass packaging, but they are willing to act accordingly. Nearly half (45%) of the UK respondents and 70% of all questioned said it is ‘likely’ or ‘very likely’ that they will buy more products in glass to make sure that glass is more available in stores.

Dave Dalton, Chief Executive of British Glass, the UK trade body supporting the campaign, comments “Consumers should have the right to healthy packaging and the right to choose glass. By supporting the Nothing to Hide campaign, consumers will assert their right to this freedom of choice and urge producers, retailers and manufacturers to ensure that their favourite foods will always be available in glass.”

Consumers can find out more about the campaign and how to support it on the Nothing to Hide website www.nothingisgoodforyou.co.uk, (live for media from 30.9.10) and by signing up to the European consumer forum behind the campaign, Friends of Glass (www.friendsofglass.com).—– Original Message —–


Berryman welcomes consultations on differentiated glass targets

Indications that Defra will be consulting early next year on setting differentiated targets for glass according to whether it is recycled back into new glass products (remelt) through a ‘closed’ loop system, or used in ‘open’ processes such as road aggregate have been welcomed by leading glass recycler, Berryman Glass.

Berryman’s General Manager, Mick Keogh, comments: “We work hard to satisfy the requirements of all our customers in both the glass and construction industries, but recognise the significant carbon benefit of quality cullet that can be used to produce more bottles and jars as we move towards a carbon based economy.”

The Government’s “Packaging Strategy” document published in June 2009 stated:

Although recycling targets have been met (78% in 2008), a third of the material collected is used for aggregates rather than turned back into containers. Co-mingled collection is not the preferred option for glass as it favours aggregates, and mixed cullet has a lower value than clear cullet, but 15% of authorities currently use this type of kerbside collection. Furthermore, around a quarter of glass packaging is used in the hospitality sector that has recycling rates of between 16% and 21%. The government has said it will consult on maximising the carbon benefits of glass packaging that could potentially include colour-specific producer responsibility targets.

Weight-based targets do not always encourage the use of recycling processes with the greatest carbon reductions. For example, recycling glass into aggregate, rather than back into glass, affords minimal cuts to carbon impact, but counts equally towards weight-based recycling targets.

“ We look forward to a positive outcome following what we hope will be rapid consultation and meaningful incentives to maximise the value of  glass recycling,” adds Mr Keogh.

Berryman welcomes MRW’s balanced approach to recyclates quality

For one of the industry’s main sources of information as well as comment, Materials Recycling Weekly has a duty to promote good practice. Rightly, its editorial staff believe that it cannot remain silent on what has become one of the main talking points over the past few years – the decline in recyclate quality.

We all have our views on this subject. They range from a denial that there is a problem to a belief that we have to return to basic hand collection and sort. The solution, as ever, is somewhere in the middle.
By calling on all channels of the waste management stream to come into one tent and find the best way of delivering quality they are providing a valuable service that we fully welcome.

Quality should be a given. Whilst we can all have our views on how best to deliver it, agreeing on a basic model that is shown to work cost effectively to everyone’s benefit cannot be disputed.

STATEMENT FROM PAUL SANDERSON, EDITOR MRW

Over the last few years, I have spoken to a number of readers about why I think it is important that MRW is a vehicle for the recycling and waste management industry to debate the vital and strategic issues affecting the way the UK deals with its waste and resources. I believe it is important on the whole, for MRW to be balanced and neutral and allow people from both sides of an argument time and space in the magazine to put their point of view ideally backed up by strong evidence. And I want that to continue.

To be honest, I feel that the debate between source separated advocates and those for commingled hasn’t developed over the past two or three years and I think now is the time to try to unite the industry for all our benefit.

MRW is not backing either side. We are not becoming a member of the Campaign for Real Recycling for example. Myself and the editorial team are not advocating source separated or commingled, but seeking a compromise solution because the evidence is increasingly suggesting that UK materials are not of sufficient quality either for UK reprocessors or for the export market. I am not against single stream commingled and MRFs per se, but there are too many cases where this collection method is not providing good enough quality material for UK reprocessors or those we export to. If that changes, then great, let’s go for commingled.

So, in this issue we are launching the Recycling United “Time for Quality” campaign and we are seeking your support. This week and over the coming weeks, we will be giving you what we believe is the evidence behind this campaign. 

Our message will still be the same as this is what others in the recycling industry think about source separated, about dual stream and yes about commingled, but make up your own minds being aware of the MRW viewpoint. If you disagree with me, then email me at paul.sanderson@emap.com to tell me why. If you agree, and want to register support, then do so by clicking on the link at the top of this page.

 Eventually, I would like to build a Courtauld Commitment-style agreement in which local authorities and stakeholder businesses commit to a united standpoint on quality with distinct aims.

This is what I suggest should form the basis of that commitment:

MRW is calling on all local authorities to have as a minimum a dual stream collection of dry recyclables by 2020. This would mean that paper and cardboard would be collected separately from other dry recyclables. Single stream commingled collections would only be used in extreme situations where no other collection method is possible and the authority should commit to a minimum overall dual stream. Ideally, local authorities will commit to source separated collection schemes, but it needs to be recognised that this system is not always practical.

Local authorities will also commit to, as a minimum, collecting the following dry materials to ensure a national standard collection system and to avoid local confusion:

  • Aluminium and steel cans
  • Paper and cardboard
  • Plastic bottles (both HDPE and PET)
  • Glass bottles and jars.

If prior to 2020, MRF technology is proven to provide equivalent quality to at least dual stream, then single stream commingled should be considered a viable and valid alternative. This is the local authority bit above. But I don’t want to only ask local authorities to commit. I would like waste management companies and materials recycling facility operators, and even plant and equipment manufacturers to sign up to the following:

MRW is calling on waste management companies and MRF operators to accept that the quality of UK recyclate needs to improve. We ask that they sign up to the following commitments:

  • The major waste management companies will as a matter of practice, advocate dual stream collections as a minimum service level when bidding for local authority (or commercial where appropriate) tenders unless they are 100% certain that the quality of material they produce from MRF technology is equivalent or better than dual stream.
  • Waste management companies and MRF operators, where single stream or dual stream sorting is required, will commit to not over-stocking conveyors at MRFs with more material than the sorting line can cope with to ensure the highest possible quality for this material.

What do you think? Do you agree with me and the MRW editorial team? If you think the above should be worded differently, email me with your suggestions or post them below.
Anyway, here are the reasons why MRW is launching this campaign and then you can decide yourself whether I am right or wrong in deciding on this standpoint.

  1. The MRW editorial team meets and talks to lots of people in the industry. Our anecdotal evidence is that those who advocate commingled are reducing in number because the evidence shows that quality of material is declining as volume of material collected increases.
  2. The majority of UK materials reprocessors are telling us that single stream commingled material leads to lower quality. They argue that they are buying the material and paying for contamination by weight they do not want. Some UK reprocessors like commingled, but recognise that there is a strong argument for keeping paper separate because it contaminates and gets contaminated by other materials. It is important to remember that the Environment Agency estimated in 2008 that the typical rejection rate at MRFs is 10.8%. This compares to less than 1% for kerbside sort schemes. Would you be upset if almost 11% of your weekly shop was contaminated with products you don’t want and are paying for? This is how UK materials reprocessing businesses feel when they buy materials from MRFs.
  3. UK materials reprocessors are starting to import material from other countries because the quality is higher and their business need is for higher quality material. This is madness when there is a surplus of material in the UK.
  4. As you will see in a feature later in this magazine, we interviewed 150 Chinese companies on their views on the UK recycling market. It was clear that they feel that they get better quality material from Japan, Germany and the United States and that material from the UK is considered expensive. Do you honestly believe that the UK’s biggest export market for recyclate will want to buy low quality and expensive material from us forever? This is a global commodities market and we need to provide material that people want to buy. Quality is key for our future competitiveness.
  5. It was controversial and interesting that WRAP has come down on one side of the argument, but the report Choosing the Right Recycling Collection System was a vital contribution to the debate. When WRAP modelled collection costs it found that source separated kerbside schemes had the lowest overall net cost, dual stream was next and single stream commingled overall was the most expensive. WRAP also found that it was the larger containers typically provided with commingled collections that leads to increased volumes of material collected and not the collection method itself. The lesson was to increase volume, increase the size of the container and this applies to both dual stream and source separated collections. If dual stream or source separated are overall cheaper and have increased container sizes, then everyone is a winner.

It is now time for the debate to move on. I don’t want to see more commingled versus source separated debates and I hope you’ll agree. Let’s see if we can unite the recycling and waste management industry, get a good debate going and hopefully compromise. We all have the same goals for recycling in this country. We’ve made massive strides in improving our municipal recycling rates and everyone involved should feel very proud. But now it’s time for quality.

Who Sorts Wins: CRR brings kerbside sorters and reprocessors together

The Campaign for Real Recycling (CRR) will bring together local authorities who practice quality recycling collections with UK and Chinese reprocessors at its Who Sorts Wins seminar in Birmingham next month.

The conference will provide attendees with a unique chance to hear the latest news direct from the Far East quality recovered materials market through Chinese buyer Wade Schuetzeberg, representing the largest buyer of quality paper in the world, America Chung Nam B.V. MLM Ltd.

The event, sponsored by May Gurney plc, also features initiatives and developments from authorities and collectors leading in the fields of kitchen waste, partnership working, and in running both kerbside sort and commingled collections side by side. Senior local authority figures will also have a chance to discuss the latest thinking in operational development, service costs, comparing experiences with collectors and reprocessors as well as other authorities.

Mal Williams, Chair of CRR, said: “Material reprocessors are crying out for quality. At the same time, many local authorities are paying too much for services which don’t prioritise it. Now WRAP has confirmed that kerbside sort should be the preferred option, we are taking this opportunity to bring together some of the authorities who are getting it right. We’ll be looking at how best to maximise quality and minimise cost and we expect everyone attending, including reprocessors, to learn something interesting they can use in pursuit of those. So it’s about information, identifying the cutting edge domestic recycling collections and also a bit of a celebration of achievements so far.”

Mick Keogh of Berryman added: “All reprocessors know they need to work closely with their suppliers. This is a chance to take stock of that relationship and to see what we can do to improve operations and recycling in general. This is a very positive and welcome development by CRR.”

Hank the singing bottle takes on Arnie in glass recycling campaign

hankThe glass sector has a new foot soldier in the battle to promote recycling in the form of Hank, ‘the singing bottle’. FEVE has developed Hank to appear in cartoon adventures about glass recycling using the ‘I’ll be back’ line made famous by Arnold Schwarzenegger in 1980s movie, The Terminator.

The cartoons will form part of a Friends of Glass marketing and social networking campaign used across the continent and will be translated into 14 European languages. Nearly eleven million tonnes, or 62%, of container glass was collected for recycling in 2007, and FEVE hopes the campaign will help focus on the remaining 38%.

Hank can be viewed via YouTube or visit www.friendsofglass.com